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Is Your Youth Hunter Ready for Deer Season?

Start Preparing Youth Hunters Now for Deer Season

 

Deer season is approaching fast. Many states are in full license allocation mode and hunters should be starting to think about how to prepare for this upcoming season. Whether you are planning to take youth hunters out for the first time or another deer season, there are a few considerations to think about during the summer.

 

What is the Right Age?

 

This is the hardest question a parent has to face when deciding on taking kids hunting. One thought is that your kids can never be too young to start getting involved in the outdoors. While this is true, there is a big difference in getting kids involved in the outdoors and actually hunting with them. Youth hunters have to have the attitude and ability to be part of the hunt. Kids with a prepared attitude should be able to deal with harvesting an animal and have an understanding of the great responsibility that brings. Hunting with kids that can accurately shoot, be patient to sit for long stints and be able to physically and safely deal with environmental conditions are all important ability aspects.

 

So what age should I start hunting with my kids? While there are regulations in many states as well as mentored youth specific programs for hunting, there is no specific age when a child is ready to hunt. You as a parent will know and be able to assess this summer how another year has added to their attitude and ability when it comes to being ready for this year’s deer season.

 

 

Formal Hunter Education for Youth Hunters

 

Besides the experience and training, you can provide your youngsters, formal hunter education programs are ways to teach your child about hunting. These hunter education programs are often mandated for kids and required before young hunters can take to the woods or buy a license. Each course is designed to teach new hunters about safety, regulations and being a good sportsperson. Courses usually consist of a full day of classroom work followed by a test of knowledge, which requires a passing score to be able to become a licensed hunter. These courses are offered throughout the summer months through your state wildlife agency and in most cases in cooperation with local sporting groups.

 

 

Mentored Youth Hunting Programs

 

Age, and more importantly attitude and ability, determine when a kid is ready to go hunting. But how does one build those skills with youth hunters? The answer is what hunters have been doing for years and has recently become part of most state wildlife agencies programs. Mentored youth hunting programs are designed for kids who either do not meet the legal age or are not all the way there enough to fully take part in hunting. This allows younger kids the ability to learn all aspects of hunting, including harvesting certain game species within a set of specific guidelines. A powerful way to get and keep kids involved in hunting. As part of preparing for deer season, review your state game laws now in summer and see what requirements there are if you are thinking about taking kids hunting for deer this season.

 

 

Practice Hunting Safety Throughout the Summer

 

Safety in hunting comes down to weapon safety. Whether it be with a firearm or bow, nothing is more important than making sure your kids and other hunters are all safe while afield. Summer is the perfect time to practice safely operating a gun and getting comfortable shooting and handling it. Cover all aspects of gun safety such as handling the firearm, loading it safety, safe shooting and range and hunting etiquette. A good choice to start kids out with is a Gamo air rifle, which is easy to handle and has low recoil to get kids comfortable shooting safely. Summer camps that provide instruction on shooting, hunting and the outdoors such as the Raised Hunting Bow Camps are a complete and valuable resource to get your kids involved in the sport.

 

Hunting Safety Tips

  1. Know your surroundings. Focus practice this summer on getting kids concentrated on the act of hunting. The most dangerous time hunting with kids, for them and you, is when they get distracted and forget about their surroundings with a loaded firearm.

 

  1. Be sure of your target. Teach your kids that you only pull the trigger when you are 100% sure of your target. When hours of hunting finally pay off with a deer within range, you need to be completely sure of your shot and what is around, behind or near it before you take the shot.

 

  1. Practice then practice again. Summer gives you the opportunity with longer days to spend more time practicing safety. Head out to the woods and practice situations your youth hunters may encounter during deer season. This will instill safety as priority one while hunting.

 

Summer Preparation Activities for Youth Hunting

 

Along with safety and hunter education, there are a number of activities you can do this summer to prepare kids for deer season. Although there are much more, these three activities will have you and your kids ready to go on opening day.

 

  • Spend time in the woods. A child’s hunting experiences will be much more enjoyable if they know exactly what they are in for. Taking kids in the outdoors often over the summer provides them a chance to explore the woods with you and get comfortable with all the sights and sounds. They will learn how to walk through the woods, look for deer sign and understand how game moves with the goal in mind of preparing for deer season.

 

  • Gear up. Do not skimp on youth hunting clothes and other gear. They will be more comfortable and more likely to enjoy the sport if they are outfitted like a hunter. Start with Under Armour youth hunting clothes matched with a good weatherproof layer and topped off with a kids orange vest and hat. Also be sure to get quality boots to keep your youth hunters comfortable and dry. Gear up in the summer so clothing and boots can be broken in before deer season. The most important piece of gear, the youth bow or gun, should be very familiar for the youth hunter by now. If they do not have a bow or gun specific for their size then go get one!

 

  • Plan Hunts Now. Each hunt is more critical than usual when taking kids hunting with you. A bad trip or two can quickly turn off the enthusiasm. Summer is when you want to plan your youth hunting Scout areas that are not too far off the trail and have little hunting pressure. Consider if you will be hunting from a stand or blind and be prepared with several locations within walking distance so you can move as patience wears. Have these spots prepared and ready to go come opening day.

 

Preparing for deer season now in the summer is even more important if you are planning on taking kids hunting in the fall. Youth hunters should be properly educated and have the attitude and ability to be part of the hunt. Focus summer activities on safety and basic hunting skills in these months leading up to deer season to ensure successful youth hunts this fall.

 

Don’t know where to start? If your kid is the right age to begin hunting, then go ahead and start with the gear. Check out Whittaker Guns for great prices on youth guns, bows, and gear! After the gear, get them acquainted to it and go over hunting safety. Then follow the rest of the blog’s advice all the way up until deer season!

How to Get Kids Hooked on Turkey Hunting

Take Time for Turkey Hunting with Kids

 

PHOTO: A few months ago we posted a photo of a 15 year old young man Austin Ochsenhirt who was in the midst of chemo treatments to battle Leukemia. This weekend I had the privilege to hunt with this young man and his grandfather “Pap” at a Hope Outdoors event in STE Genevieve MO..We can proudly announce that Austin is not only in REMISSION!!, but he is officially a RAISED HUNTING turkey reaper!!!! Please join us in saying THANK YOU GOD!! – David Holder

 

If you have children in your life, you likely want to pass some of your outdoor passion and skills onto them at some point. You probably learned how to hunt from your parents or grandparents and have many fond memories of it. Now you desperately wish to be that kind of youth hunting mentor to the next generation. The spring turkey season is the perfect way to get them involved right now and teach them the skills they need. But turkey hunting with kids can be frustrating sometimes. It’s not always easy or enjoyable, and that’s especially true when you don’t take the right approach. If you miss certain truths about hunting with kids and don’t take the necessary preparatory steps first, it will be an uphill battle you’re likely to lose. What’s worse, you could risk turning them off of hunting for several years or throughout their lifetimes if you do it wrong.

But it’s obviously critical for more youth to get involved in hunting again. As each generation grows up and more people leave rural areas for cities, the number of hunters drops. That’s a huge problem. Hunters are largely responsible for funding wildlife and habitat projects across the U.S., and have a real interest in the success of those programs. Hunting can also teach kids many core values that are important and relevant in their everyday lives. So if you’ve been thinking about taking your kids turkey hunting, now is the time.

 

Remember Hunting Safety First

 

As you start turkey hunting with kids, you need to remember one thing above all. Make sure you take time to teach your kids about safe hunting practices. Even if they’re just sitting with you and not physically pulling the trigger, they need to understand what’s safe and what isn’t. That means you also need to demonstrate safe behaviors yourself. Kids learn mostly by observing role models in their lives. If you take time now to set a positive image in their minds, they will be more likely to be safe hunters once it’s time for them to go out on their own.


 

Tips for Turkey Hunting with Kids

 

There are a couple things you can proactively do to keep your kids happy (and you sane) while turkey hunting. That’s probably the biggest principle you can take away from this article: keep things fun. If your kids don’t have a good time or they feel like they’re being yelled at or ridiculed, they might be more inclined to pass on the next hunting trip. Not to say you should coddle them either; take advantage of teachable moments without resorting to yelling.

 

Hide Your (Kids’) Movement

It’s often been said that the hardest thing to teach a kid is to be still. Just look at them. They’re always reaching for something, fidgeting around, or not-so-quietly whispering something. Obviously all of the above are bad news when it comes to hunting turkeys. Wild turkeys have amazing eyesight and can notice when you even slightly shift your shotgun, let alone when your son or daughter is practically vibrating. In addition, the weather during turkey hunting season is usually pretty dicey, especially in the early parts of the season. It wouldn’t be uncommon to hunt in cold, windy, and rainy conditions. As you can probably guess, that’s some of the worst weather to try turkey hunting with kids. That is, if you’re exposed.

 

 

The easiest way to conquer those issues is through using a hunting blind. Within a blind, they can stay dry, feel comfortable, and have the freedom to move around a bit without jeopardizing your hunt. Primos® Double Bull Bullpen blind features 180-degree view and plenty of room for a couple kids and even a camera man. Placed on a clover field or hay field that greens up ahead of most other food sources, you can be sure you’ll see turkeys. Even if it’s all hens and jakes, just being able to watch turkeys in the wild is a valuable opportunity for your child. But a word of warning: a hunting blind should not mean a free pass for your kid to do what they want. They’re still learning how to hunt turkeys after all, which means holding still and being quiet. If they don’t learn that lesson while in the field, they will be set up for failure later on.

Turkey Hunting Practice Tips

If your child is of a legal hunting age and can actually hunt with you instead of just observing, you need to set them up for the best possible outcome well before you go hunting. Plan on practicing shotgun youth shooting skills beforehand until you feel they can make an ethical shot and handle the pressure. Let them pattern their youth shotgun on a turkey outline so they can feel confident about themselves and not fear the recoil. Teach them how to use their own Primos® turkey calls and practice with them in the weeks before the season. In the field, let them do a few calls themselves. It might not sound great, but that will be a learning experience in itself. Take time to watch turkey hunting videos together and make sure they understand the process as much as possible before you go out.

 

Keep it Fun

As mentioned earlier in the article, the best way to fuel the hunting fire in your son or daughter is to have fun with them. Turkey hunting with kids can be frustrating, but only if you go into it with the wrong expectations. Try to not pressure your kids into hunting with you; instead, ask them to go, but don’t push them if they don’t want to. Let them come to you. If they’re interested, go shopping with them and let them pick out some of their own Realtree® turkey hunting camo clothes.

 

 

Adopt a different frame of mind when you hunt with your kids. You’re not really out there to kill a gobbler; that’s just a bonus if it happens. You’re out there to spend time with your kids in a different capacity and introduce them to the beautiful sport of hunting. As such, keep hunts on the short side, especially if the weather is poor and you’re not in a hunting blind. As soon as they start losing interest or complaining, it might be time to pack it in for the day. But if you’d like them to stay as long as possible, bring some snacks and talk with them. Make it feel like a fun adventure with their mom or dad, not a boring time of being quiet.

 

Try Turkey Hunting with Kids

 

Remember that in the end, taking kids hunting can and should be a really fun experience for both of you. It should be a time of bonding, not frustration and anger. Also remember that hunting teaches life lessons that your child will really benefit from; don’t cheat them from it. Take time to be a good hunting mentor and role model for them, and you’ll gain a hunting partner for life.

Take the Family Hunting this Holiday Season

Family Hunting Over the Holidays

 

The holidays are devoted to family time. It is the one time of the year to catch up with distant relatives, share stories of the past hunting season with close family members and look towards a new year of success outdoors and within our personal lives. All those being true, it is also a great time to enjoy some family hunting.

 

Hunting during the holidays is not for everyone. The weather is terrible (think snow, wind chills and early darkness) and not to mention those animals that are still out there are the best of the best. Only the most mature bucks, strongest birds and fastest small mammals have made it through lengthy hunting seasons to this point. Any game left is crafty and elusive so hunting this time of year will not come easy.

 

Family hunting around the holidays makes perfect sense, though. Kids are off from school for an extended period and usually you also have a few days off surrounding Christmas and New Years. This presents more opportunities for families to get outdoors for some quality time hunting. There is often no better place for life lessons than the freezing duck blind, snowy pheasant field or oak flat searching out winter squirrels. Hunting with kids is not only about harvesting an animal but more related to the skills and facilitation of conversation that hunting opens up. Also, hunting is not the only outdoor activity to take part in over the holidays. Holiday break can be a great time to also introduce kids to shooting. Whether it is in the backyard with a new Bear Archery bow or time at the shooting range plinking with .22s, both give you that chance to connect with your kids outdoors.

 

Hunting during the holidays is also a tradition for many families. As we grow up and start our own lives, hunting is a way to reconnect with siblings and extended family members over the holidays. Instead of sitting around eating meal after meal for days, plan a hunt with family. This will get you outdoors and back among family enjoying the sport of hunting you grew up with. Family holiday hunting can either be scheduled at a hunting club or outfitter or it can be simply a preplanned time to get a few family members to head out to the local public grounds for a half day small game hunt. Either way, family hunting over the holidays enables a reconnection with the past, the ability to relive hunting experiences and an opportunity to start your kids hunting among family.

 

Family Hunting Options for the Holidays

 

For those looking to plan some hunting during the holidays, there are numerous opportunities depending on where you are located. Most states have small game seasons open throughout the winter. Also, select deer seasons come back in around the holidays such as late-season archery and traditional muzzleloader. If nothing else, game farms and hunting preserves usually have family hunting opportunities. The upside is that most hunting opportunities available over the holidays are better suited for a family. For instance, deer hunting is often solitary. You may hunt the same general area with your kids or friends but usually, it is you by yourself in a tree stand for hours. Hunting waterfowl, small game or upland birds, all of which are typically in season around Christmas, aligns more with group family hunting trips. These types of hunts are fun and shareable with friends and family.

kids-family-hunting-this-holiday-season-pic1

Tips for Balancing Hunting During the Holidays

 

Even though the holidays are a joyous time of year, they are jammed packed with dinners, visits, and other family related activities. Do not worry, however, there are ways to accomplish it all and take part in some family holiday hunting. With some planning and a little compromising, you can find ways to get outdoors over the holidays. Here are five tips on how to balance the holidays with family hunting.

 

  1. Schedule It

    . With hunting, you know what is in season this time of year so there are no excuses not to schedule a time to hunt well in advance. Marking your calendar early ensures you schedule time for family hunting trips but it also allows the rest of your family to plan the remaining holiday season.

 

  1. Preplan

    . Preplanning is similar to scheduling, except once you have hunting scheduled during the holidays you need to plan all that goes into it. If you plan ahead of time, you will not have to spend precious time away from family around Christmas and New Year’s searching Scheels for winter Under Armour clothing or other last minute gear you may need for winter hunting.

 

  1. Communicate

    . The most important tip for balancing hunting during the holidays is communicating with your family about your schedule and plans. Communicate your intentions for the holidays (days you will be gone, when you will be available, etc.) but also remember to stay in touch with family while you are away. Your holiday household will be much healthier if everyone is on the same page regarding the holiday schedule.

 

  1. Experiences Matter Most

    . Family hunting comes down to spending quality time outdoors with your kids and other family members. Plan hunts that are ones where all your family can get involved and enjoy. Great experiences outdoors will lead to a family holiday hunting tradition shared year after year.

 

  1. Compromise

    . As the years go by, life changes. We grow up, have families and change priorities. It is important to compromise over the holidays. Years ago you may have spent all your time off around Christmas hunting. However, you may now have to narrow that down to a few days. By compromising between hunting and non-hunting activities over the holidays, you will have a complete and enjoyable holiday season.

 

The holiday season brings with it traditions and time spent with family that is unique to this time of year. Family hunting is one of those traditions that provides an opportunity to bring together different generations outdoors. Make the most of this holiday season by spending time with you kids hunting and enjoying time with family and friends outdoors.

when is the right time to take your youth hunting | Raised Hunting

When Is the Right Time to Take Your Youth Hunting?

Youth Hunting | When Is the Right Time to Take Kids Hunting

Doesn’t it seem like each fall disappears in a crazy blur? Between schools starting back up, getting ready for winter, and of course hunting seasons, it’s easy to lose track of time. As a result, we tend to push some things off our plate, resolving to do them in the mythical “later” category. But “later” might not happen. That’s why it’s important to dedicate time now to life-altering things like taking your youth hunting. Think about it; if you go hunting with a child and patiently pass on your outdoors knowledge to them, you will theoretically create another grounded and responsible adult who’s connected to their food source and the world. Hunting teaches ethics, responsibility, patience, and respect. What more could you want for your children?

So it’s obviously important to get your kids in the outdoors when they’re young. How young? That depends entirely on you and your child. Some kids are ready to go afield much younger than others. It can be challenging to teach them everything, but family hunting is also a great way to spend more time with your kids doing something you love. In this post, we’ll look at some common signs your child may be ready for youth hunting, and some tips to help you teach them what they need to know.

Signs They May Be Ready for Youth Hunting 

when is the right time to take your youth hunting | Raised HuntingIf you notice the following behaviors about your son or daughter, they may well be ready to head to the woods with you. First, if they’re asking to come with you on a hunt, it’s definitely time to start doing some kind of outdoors activity with them. Even if you’re just doing a mock-hunt (discussed below), it’s a great time to get your youth outdoors.

Similarly, if they routinely ask a lot of questions about hunting-related activities, show them in the field instead of simply telling them. Better yet, put them in situations where they can learn the answer on their own without having to explain it. If they are going on make-believe hunts on their own, they’re probably ready too!

If they are intensely curious when you bring a wild game animal home, they may be ready. Encourage them to hold or handle the hide, antlers, feathers, etc. and teach them throughout the butchering/processing task. Some people worry their kids may be too sensitive to see a dead animal. If they seem to be bothered by it, explain the emotions you feel when hunting and that you’re respecting the animal by eating it around the table.

General Rules of Youth Hunting 

One of the best and most important things you can do to teach your child about hunting is to be patient. Kids are going to be too loud in the woods, make mistakes, have short attention spans, and do all sorts of other things that will make you think about quitting. Keep your emotions under control and use any mishaps as teachable moments.

You also may want to start them on smaller animals, such as birds, squirrels, or rabbits. These seem to carry less emotional weight for most kids, and are more their size. As they get used to hunting small game animals, start to introduce larger ones like whitetails.

Try to make every hunt or time in the woods as fun and enjoyable as possible for them. It’s not the time for all-day sits or extreme temperatures either. Keep the field adventures short, comfortable, and enjoyable. The more fun they have, the more likely they are to want to go back. From there, you can slowly introduce reality to them without putting them off.

Emotions of Youth Hunting

Think back to your first successful youth hunt. It may have been exhilarating. Or it may have caused some tears to flow. Teaching your kids beforehand about the emotions they might feel is a good approach. Watch hunting shows with them and show them the wild game you have killed. How do they react? When/if they make a marginal shot and are kicking themselves for it, encourage them. Let them know that it happens to everyone. But as long as they do everything they can to find the animal or exhaust all possibilities, they haven’t done anything wrong. Also let them know that killing an animal shouldn’t be done lightly, and that they deserve a lot of respect by hunting ethically.

First Field Trip 

If they seem like they’re interested in hunting and you have done a few of the steps above, it’s time for your first hunting trip together. Ask them if they’d like to go hunt with you in a ground blind somewhere. Obviously if you’re hunting with kids, you shouldn’t go on a high-stakes hunt after a hit-list buck or you’ll just get frustrated. Instead, simply set up a ground blind in the backyard where you can watch wildlife, even just squirrels or rabbits. Use the time as an opportunity to teach basic hunting skills (e.g., how to be quiet, how slowly to move, how to listen and look for animals, etc.). If they like sitting with you, you could bring a Gamo® .177 or .22 caliber rifle with and have them shoot their first squirrel or rabbit. This is assuming that they have gone through all the necessary firearm safety courses and are legally able to hunt, of course. If they are interested in bow hunting, consider sending them to bow camps for children where they can learn about archery. If they’re really interested, consider getting a Bear Archery® youth hunting bow.

Moving Up to Larger Game Animals 

when is the right time to take your youth hunting | Raised HuntingAs they get better about hunting small game animals, it might be time to introduce them to larger ones. If they’re not quite ready for a full day in the woods, take them out after you get an animal to help you track the blood trail. After you shoot a whitetail, for example, follow the trail and check to make sure they are down. Then bring your kid out to “help” you find it. Show them where you shot it, and help them stay on the blood trail. With your helpful nudges, they should eventually lead you to the deer. Explain how grateful you are to them and that you could have never found it without their help. This encouragement and the excitement of finding a deer usually cements their interest in youth hunting. Your passion and enthusiasm is contagious with kids, so let them see it in your actions.

After they’ve helped you in the woods, try a few co-sits together, where you’re both actually in the tree stand or ground blind with the purpose of hunting deer. While there’s not a lot of required hunting gear for kids, make sure that they are dressed in appropriate and comfortable youth hunting clothes like Under Armour® clothing. Stop by Scheels® to load up on any essential hunting gear for them. Offer help or advice to them throughout the trip, but also use it as an opportunity to test their skills and knowledge. If they do really well without your help a few times, they’re probably ready for their first deer hunt all by themselves. If possible, try not to impose too many quality deer management rules on them their first year. Let them take a doe, a spike buck, or a mature buck – anything they want. This will keep them interested and lay the foundation for future hunts.

Get Started Now 

Taking kids hunting can be a lot of work, it’s true. But youth hunting is also some of the best quality time you can spend with your child. If you start exposing them to the outdoors and wild game at a young age, they will be much more likely to become confident hunters one day. And you’ll have created one of the best hunting buddies you could ever have.

oppurtunities challenges with youth hunting | Raised Hunting

Opportunities and Challenges with Youth Hunting

Ways of Getting Kids Involved and Mistakes to Avoid with Youth Hunting

Each and every time you go hunting it is special. Whether you have been hunting for 30 years or have just started with the sport, you have or will accumulate a lot of special outdoor memories from each day in the field. For those that have been sportsmen and women since early youth hunting days, we remember our first positive hunting experience and nothing is more special than being there for that first successful youth hunting experience by our own children.

Like many who love to be outdoors and hunt, our hope has always been to share our passion for the outdoors with our children. Hunting is more than a sport, it is a lifestyle that passes along values like tradition, respect and a desire to better ourselves. As parents, we want our children to grow up with an interest in the outdoors, and hunting particularly so that they can enjoy and understand how the family hunting tradition enriches our lives. There are, however, times when youth hunting may not develop as we would like. Kids will move to their own passions early on and as parents, we respect that. While there is no guarantee that each one of our kids will take part in our outdoor passion, there are certain things we can do as a parent or youth hunting mentor to help in developing that lifelong passion for hunting.

3 Tips for Getting Kids Involved in Hunting

Generally, kids take an interest in just about anything their parents are doing. At a young age, children are fascinated by what you do and curious about being like you. It is a good thing and one characteristic that helps in getting kids involved in hunting. If your kids seem to take an interest in hunting, here are three youth hunting tips to help foster that interest.

Start Youth Hunting Early 

Curiosity alone will have your kids asking questions about where you are going or what type of animal that is if you should be so lucky to harvest one. Eventually, that curiosity will lead to the time when they ask if they can go with you hunting.

Getting asked this question as a parent is both amazingly satisfying and also challenging. It can be tough because many of us take hunting seriously, and rightfully so. But getting kids involved in hunting at a young age requires you to adapt and change the way you hunt. Having your kids along means making shorter trips, hunting different and often unproductive areas and lowers your expectations about the chances of harvesting an animal. These are the sacrifices you need to make to get your kids hunting early on in life.

Starting them early is different than pushing them into the sport. Children can quickly lose interest in the outdoors simply from being pushed too hard because a parent or youth hunting mentor wants so badly for them to take part in the outdoor experience. We, as hunters, all want our kids hunting with us. However, forcing them into hunting either too soon or because they have yet to build an interest will be the quickest way to lose a future hunter. If they do not show as much interest as you would like, then give them their space. Often youth hunting takes times. Always keep the invitation open, but never force them to be an unwilling participant.

First Impressions Matter

Regardless of the child’s age, the first few days afield are the most critical in determining whether or not he/she maintains an interest in hunting. These first youth hunting experiences, like any first impression, are where the child is going to form their opinion about hunting. They are either going to decide that hunting is fun and enjoyable or that it may not be something for them. Your job is to not push them and make the first impression a fun youth hunting experience.

The first step to ensuring that a child’s first hunt is not their last is to keep the initial outings brief. Kids have short attention spans, for no fault other than being a kid. That being said, the last thing they want to do is go sit in a blind or a Hawk ladder tree stand for hours on end no matter how into hunting they may already be. As soon as the questions start coming, like “when are we leaving?” or “how much longer are we hunting?”, their attention has veered away from hunting. Take these cues as it is time to make a change or wrap it up completely for the day. Either change spots, take a walk or end the youth hunting day completely.

Secondly, during that time you are focused on hunting you want to help young hunters be successful. All the youth hunting tips and best practices only go so far if eventually a child does not get to experience success. Success can take many forms but for kids, it usually relates to harvesting an animal. Kids find it difficult to comprehend sitting for hours not seeing or shooting any game. Start them off with hunting squirrels, doves or other small game where there are opportunities to see and harvest animals. The other alternative is to find hunting areas that are plentiful with game. Many landowners are willing to open up their farms and forests to youth hunting if you ask. Many times these private oases are loaded with does and absent from other hunters, especially during youth hunting seasons.

Although there is a substantial amount of time and effort leading up to a first successful youth hunt, the first taste of success almost always instantly hooks a kid to hunting for life. Excitement and a sense of accomplishment flow from a kid’s eyes when they harvest their first game animal. The excitement and sense of pride are not only within the child but also with you, knowing you played a big part in their success, which is rewarding no matter what activity it is your kids are doing.

Equipping Youth Hunters Properly

Along with making a good first impression to young hunters, your kids should be as comfortable as possible while outdoors. Equip your kids with the right youth hunting clothing and gear. If you are fully invested in hunting with kids, then invest in them with the proper equipment. Youth hunting clothing today has many of the same qualities adult clothing has to ensure your kids stay warm and dry. This is sometimes an expensive proposition as kids grow out of clothes just about each year, but the downside to not having good hunting clothing and proper boots could be a lost future hunter.

oppurtunities challenges with youth hunting | Raised Hunting

Aside from clothing and gear, you also want to make sure the weapon they are using is fitted correctly for them. The most important reason is for safety. An oversized firearm can lead to not being able to shoulder the gun correctly and recoil that is unmanageable. You want to find youth versions of a firearm and introduce youth hunters early to shooting to make sure the weapon is safe to use and they know how to be safe shooting it. For a bow, it means finding one with the proper draw length and weight so it is comfortable to pull back and shoot. Bear Archery has several youth bow packages that are specifically designed with kids in mind. Without considering the right equipment, including a firearm or bow, your kids may become frustrated and disappointed. Equip them properly, no different than you would yourself, for successful youth hunting.

6 Youth Hunting Mistakes to Avoid 

Hunting with kids is both rewarding and challenging. It is much different than hunting with a buddy or by yourself. Once you have peaked an interest in hunting, avoid these six mistakes when taking your kids hunting.

Unrealistic Expectations

Expectations for youth hunting are and should be, much different than those you have heading to the woods by yourself. Kids will be restless and inquisitive, both of which should be expected while hunting. Encourage questions about the outdoors and hunting. Hunting with younger kids is more about the experience and teaching them the sport than harvesting an animal. Avoid getting frustrated when game animals get spooked away or if you are bombarded with questions during a youth hunting outing.

Not Focusing on Fun

If something is not fun, a child will be reluctant to do the activity again. The same holds true with hunting. Instead of trying to sit motionless for hours on end, identify birds and trees or start a mini scavenger hunt to keep it fun. Let them use your Nikon binoculars to spot game or blow a few grunts from your Primos grunt tube. In addition, talk up hunting every chance you get. Half of the adventure is the anticipation and the planning before the hunt.

Missing Youth Hunting Opportunities

Many states have started youth hunting seasons as a way to give youngsters an opportunity outside of the normal adult hunting seasons. These few days a year can be some of the best for youth hunting as hunting pressure is limited and some even provide an early chance at deer or turkeys before the main season opens.

There are also many mentored youth hunting programs available in different states to provide opportunities for kids to learn from a licensed adult hunter. License fees are reduced and special privileges are granted to youth hunters as a way to expand their opportunities. Take advantage of all you can.

Forgetting Safety First

Safety should always be priority one while hunting, especially when hunting with kids. Avoid even the chance of a safety mistake by thinking ahead on what may be encountered during the hunt. For instance, focus on firearm safety if going out for deer or discuss how to walk safely through the woods if you plan on traversing rough terrain. Accidents do and will happen, but preparing beforehand as much as possible from a safety standpoint lessens the chances they will.

Hunting in Extreme Weather

Days in the woods are limited by work and other daily life responsibilities. Avoid pushing to hunt on a day when the weather is bad. Nothing can ruin a youth hunting experience more than being uncomfortable while in the field. If bad weather cannot be avoided, then make sure you have the proper youth hunting clothing and gear needed to make the experience as comfortable and safe as possible.

Overly Controlling the Hunt

Part of hunting is being outdoors. That means enjoying and exploring the natural environment. A common mistake, particularly with younger hunters, is to overly control every action of the hunt. Relinquishing control on things like letting your kids prepare their own youth hunting gear or having them use the Garmin to find the hunting spot are all ways to get them more involved in the hunt. It is part of the learning process, and by doing everything for them they will never be able to learn from their mistakes.

To conclude, there are many opportunities and challenges when it comes to youth hunting. Getting kids involved in hunting is a rewarding experience for a parent or hunting mentor. Your focus should be to get kids involved early without pushing them, make a good first impression when hunting and to give them the proper tools, clothing and gear they need to be successful.

In order to continue the enthusiasm for hunting beyond those first few hunts, avoid certain mistakes like having unrealistic expectations, not having fun, missing youth hunting opportunities, forgetting about safety, hunting in extreme weather and controlling every aspect of the hunt. Finally, hunting with kids comes down to the experience and instilling in them the values the sport provides with the hope they will continue the tradition on into their adult lives. Reflect on each youth hunting outing not only from your perspective but from your child’s viewpoint. Let them shape the experience and tell the tale from their eyes. Getting kids involved and trying to avoid youth hunting mistakes along the way go far in growing the next generation of outdoorsmen and women.