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Season 8 of Raised Hunting Premieres in July on the Outdoor Channel

It is hard to believe that we are set once again to release a new series of  Raised Hunting on Outdoor Channel. Eight years have flown by, and sometimes I catch myself wishing we could go back in time to relive some of those special moments. Thank God we have Raised Outdoors where we can watch any episode from any season at any time. 

As I catch myself reminiscing in the past, I try to remind myself that we can’t have memories if we don’t continue to live our lives to the fullest, and that’s all the fuel we need to push us on to the next adventure, the next season and the next hunt. 

What to Expect this Season

Season 8 is going to bring you an amazing season of beautiful landscape and imagery, dozens of wild animals at close range and a plethora of highs and lows that seem to be synonymous with hunting. More important than all that, will be the stories that unfold from the hearts of a hunting family, leaving us with those gut wrenching lessons we learn from life and from hunting. 

Season 8 will take our family and friends to places where we have never been before, to hunt animals we’d only dreamed about, until this year. We will travel to the west where the mountains seem to stretch beyond the clouds, and where the plains are so vast that even the savviest of hunters would wonder how anyone could get within bow range of anything out here.

The bugle of the bull elk will pierce the silence of another beautiful New Mexico sunrise, the roaring gobble of a turkey will sit us up a little taller in our chair, and when an antelope continues to close the distance, you will feel like you are there with us. 

Shotguns will echo in the distance as birds fall from the sky, and arrows will find their mark as they silently but humanely find their way into the exact spot we had spent hours dreaming about.  

Season Highlights

Maybe the highlight will be the elk Warren calls in, the unique whitetail that David has been seeking his entire life, or maybe it will be the second mountain lion that Karin encounters at eight yards. 

Whatever it is, it won’t be the same for any of us, each of us will find that peace, that part of Raised Hunting’s Season 8 that will hit us when and where we weren’t expecting it. It will be that moment that will stick with us and remind us that nothing lasts forever, and soon that moment will be a memory, and we will be left once again wishing for more. God willing we will be working on providing just that, another season of moments and memories. 

Raised Hunting Air times 2021 Season 8 on Outdoor Channel

Monday 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday at 12:30 a.m.

Wednesday 12:30 p.m.

Thursday 6:30 a.m.

God Bless and Good Hunting-David “Dad” Holder

Why Feed Your Deer!

When it comes to scouting for your next big buck there are tons of ways to go about it. From checking trails, rubs and scrapes in the dead of winter when the woods seem to look like an architectural blueprint of where every deer lives, to spending your spring picking up antlers that tell you exactly who is still out there, and what kind of potential they really have.  Maybe you’re like us and you spend your summers driving the dirt roads in your area hoping to actually lay eyes on that dream buck. Or you want something tangible for your efforts, so you strategically place trail cameras out to catch a picture of the deer nobody else knows about. Whether you already do all of these things, or none of them, our goal is to give you some proven fine-tuning points that will help you get the most out of any scouting you do.  In May or June the only thing going on in the deer woods is bucks beginning to grow their antlers back and does are starting to have little ones. This wouldn’t seem like a very good time to do much scouting for whitetails and for the most part you would be right. However, there are a couple things you could be doing.

Set out deer feed

Believe it or not, May and June can be a great time to set out food blocks or mineral blocks and put a camera on them. Yes, it’s true you won’t get a picture of a fully racked giant buck, but what you will get is deer finding your feed or mineral site which will help in the next couple months when the bucks’ racks are fully developed, and they return to your smorgasbord.

Add protein to their diet 

The great thing about doing this is you can be improving the health of your deer herd by feeding them beneficial nutrients they may not be getting elsewhere. Feeding minerals at this time is extremely advantageous for the does as they are under a great deal of stress from both giving birth and raising their newborns. While feeding your deer during this time may not deliver immediate results, anytime your deer are healthier they have the potential to grow larger, because when they have access to certain nutrients, they have a better opportunity to reach their maximum potential. Even though we do utilize feeders in some areas, one of our favorite ways to feed is by using a pre-made block. They are easy to handle and carry into remote locations, they also seem to last longer than dumping bags of food on the ground.

One quick tip: don’t put your blocks in random locations, keep them in areas where deer are naturally feeding. Placing food in the wrong area can actually do more harm than good. For more information on how to attract and feed deer to support growth, check out our YouTube channel, or become a member of Raised Outdoor and follow along all year long.

Late Season Hunting

Late Season Hunting | It Can Be A Family Affair

Late Season Hunting I A Great Opportunity with Friends and Family

Snow is beginning to fall across the Country, and as the white starts to come down, a great time develops to slap on the Under Armour, break out the Bear bow, muzzleloader, or slug gun, and tuck in close to a food source in the preparation for some cold weather, late season hunting.

The months of December and January can be two of the best months to find yourself in the deer stand or box blind in search of your hit-list buck. White-tailed deer during the latter part of the season are no longer focused on breeding and have changed their attention to survival. This is especially true for mature bucks that are worn down from the heavy rutting activity. Success with late season hunting is all about cold weather, and keying in on food and cover. Although the conditions may be somewhat harsh, the late season can also be a great time to share the blind or deer stand with your friends and family.

Food = Late Season Hunting Success

No doubt, if you read any article that discusses tips and tactics for late season hunting success it will make some reference to the importance of focusing on a food source. The reason you see the topic of hunting food sources continue to be repeated is simple, it is because it really is an important part of most late season hunting strategies. Now hunting food sources is not the end all be all, but keying in on these areas and building your overall hunting strategies around them can be a great move and can lead to putting a cold weather whitetail on the ground.

When the weather turns cold and the snow begins to cover the ground, deer will begin to keying on food sources that are high in protein and carbohydrates. At this point in the year, whitetails and more specifically bucks are focused on replenishing their fat reserves and their body condition. They have been physical appearance and health has greatly deteriorated from heavy rutting activity. In order to make sure that they make it through a hard winter, food will constantly be on the mind.

Not all food sources are created the same, however, so as a result there are some food sources that are sure to be more productive during the late season than others. For example, clover plots are excellent locations to ambush an early season whitetail, but during the late season, they have lost their luster. In contrast, forages like turnip and radish plots as well as grain fields like corn and soybeans can certainly be key areas to focus on during cold weather whitetail hunting. When you read about hunting grain fields during the late season, you often hear the term “standing grain”. Standing soybeans or standing corn is simply areas that have either been planted as a food source for wildlife or are areas that have been unharvested by the farmer. In both cases, these areas are exceptional areas for late season hunting.

Standing grains do provide a little bit of a benefit verse hunting a completely cut corn or soybean field. The main reason is the ease in which whitetail deer can get to the food. Standing grains make it easy for the deer to access, whereas a completely cut field or even cereal grain fields like winter rye or winter wheat may be a little more difficult. This is exceptionally true when the cold weather hits and the ground begin to freeze or be covered with snow. That being said, both areas are exceptional locations to put a late season deer on the ground.

There is another added benefit to hunting areas such as standing grain fields during the late-season, and that is simply visibility. Hunting a corn or bean field, especially from an elevated position can help you put your Nikon to work and allow you survey a large area from a distance. Hunting from an elevated box blind or tripod stand can be an excellent way to put a late season whitetail on the ground, but they can also help you in your overall scouting efforts as well. Often, hunting from these types of sets and treating them as more of an “observational stand” can help you further hone in on major areas of entry and exit into the food source, allowing you to move in close and hang a stand. Food sources are a great hub in which you can build your late season hunting strategy around, and should be high on your list of areas to key in on when the cold weather moves in.
late-season-hunting-pic1

The Importance of Cover

When the weather turns cold, we like to wrap up under a blanket next to a warm fire and just hang out. Occasionally, we will get up to stretch our legs and get something to eat. The same can be said for white-tailed deer during the cold weather of the late season. The cold weather and short days have the deer desperately clinging to the cover, conserving energy and only making an appearance when it is time to grab a quick bite to eat before the frigid temperatures of the night kick in.

When you looking at the types of areas that whitetail deer tend to seek out during the cold weather of the late season, there are a few types of areas that tend to stand out over the others. The first is areas that have a southwesterly aspect. These areas tend to receive more direct sunlight during the winter months, and as a result are typically warmer with less snow cover than the north facing slope. Whitetail deer will key in on these areas and utilize these areas as bedding locations as well as mid-day loafing areas. Thick areas such as cedar thickets or woodlots that have had Timber Stand Improvement or other types of thinning practices completed will often provide the dense thermal cover that whitetails and other wildlife need during the cold temperatures of the late season.

During other times of the year, it would be in your best interest to avoid putting much pressure on the bedding areas, choosing to hunt the perimeters verse getting in close. That philosophy changes during the late season. With time winding down, the late season is often the time to put on the ScentCrusher and tuck in close to the bedding areas. Hunting these areas can be challenging, but if you are patient and ensure that you have an easy way of entry and exit of the location, and ensure the wind is right for your set and you can find yourself sending around or a GoldTip down range.

It is a Family Affair

The late season is cold and usually wet and snowy. For some, it doesn’t necessarily sound like fun, but believe it or not, the late season can be an excellent time to get out on the field with your family and friends. There is something about cold weather that brings people together, and from the comfort of a blind or deer stand many memories can be made.

One of the aspects of late season hunting that makes it so memorable is often the conditions. The cold conditions tend to stick in your memory banks, but it also makes the hot chocolate or coffee taste that much better. Another aspect of the late season that makes it so memorable and a great time to get your family and friends outdoors is the activity. The woods tend to come alive when the weather turns cold and the snow is on. Whitetails are not the only critters that tend to show themselves during this time as birds, small game, and other wildlife species are alive and well and make for some enjoyable hours in the stand. Whitetail hunting during the late season is many whitetail hunters favorite time to hit the woods, and if you find yourself in the position of still having a tag left to burn, some of the best hunting may still be ahead of you. If you get a chance to get out and brave the elements for late season whitetails you might just be happy that you did. Good luck!