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6 Summer Hunting Chores for Getting Kids Involved in Hunting

Ways for Getting Kids Involved in Hunting Over the Summer

Hunting doesn’t stop at the end of the season. In fact, most of the time, the work you put into hunting occurs during the offseason. Summer is a prime example. There are many hunting chores that need to be done over summer that also serve as opportunities for getting kids involved in hunting. The amount of work over the summer is amplified if you’re lucky enough to be hunting with kids this upcoming season. Summer hunting chores such as preparing your tree stands, creating better shooting lanes and improving habitat quality are all exemplified when acting as a youth hunting mentor.

Getting kids involved in hunting takes a lot of work. The key is starting early with youth hunters and incorporating them as much as possible in any and all hunting activities. The more you take them with you and get them involved the more chances they’ll see game and build a lifelong love for the outdoors. No better time for keeping the interest of youth hunters than summer. There are numerous tasks that need to be done over summer in preparation for deer season, but these six summer hunting chores are ideal for increasing the youth hunting experience.

Summer Hunting Chores Perfect for Involving Kids

1. Sight in your gun and/or bow
2. Deploy and monitor trail cameras
3. Conduct tree stand maintenance
4. Implement a summer deer feeding program
5. Start preseason scouting for hunting season
6. Organize and inventory hunting gear

Sighting in Your Gun and/or Bow

Summer is a great time for sighting in your gun or bow. Depending on how last season transpired, you may have added a new scope or sight or possibly even be in the market for purchasing a new gun. Take kids with you to the shooting range and teach them range etiquette and firearms safety. It’s a great time to also teach kids to shoot. Start with a small caliber like a .22 rifle or a youth bow from Bear Archery. Don’t rush this process but teach them and help them learn so they are ready to hunt or hunt more effectively this season.

Deploying and Monitoring Trail Cameras

Summer trail camera strategies provide a wealth of information. Using trail cameras in the summer also provides a great opportunity for getting kids involved in hunting. Part of the youth hunting experience is learning all aspects of the sport. With trail camera maintenance, they’ll learn why using a game camera is important, how to properly hang and check a camera and get to observe plenty of deer and other game when it is time to look at the results. Plus, a second-hand makes for quick work with this summer hunting chore.

Conducting Tree Stand Maintenance

Tree stand maintenance includes both permanent and portable tree stands. The most important part of tree stand maintenance is safety. You want to check items such as degraded straps, rusty bolts, faulty cables or anything else on your tree stands that have the potential of failing while you are hunting this season. Also, summer is a good time to learn the ins and outs of a new tree stand or add accessories to existing tree stands. As a youth hunting mentor, your first priority is safety which is why this summer hunting chore is so critical. Emphasize this when hunting with kids and even incorporate them into these maintenance activities. They can help replace straps and check stands for signs of wear. In addition, now is the time to teach them how to properly use a tree stand and show them how you and your kids will be hunting out them in the fall.

Implementing a Summer Deer Feeding Program

A summer deer feeding program implemented correctly is time-consuming. The more help you have the better and in turn the more successful it will be. Food plots will not only provide critical forage for summer deer, but they also make for great youth hunting opportunities come fall. Besides food plots, a good summer feeding program will use mineral stations. These may be used in conjunction with your trail camera surveys or simply on their own. Either way, they will need regularly checked and resupplied.

Starting Preseason Scouting Now

Scouting can and should be a year-round activity. Remember, however, that summer deer patterns are not the same as fall. Deer in summer are more predictable and make for easier observation. Not hugely valuable come fall but an ideal scenario for getting kids involved in hunting. This builds excitement for the kids but also keeps you in the woods making notes of how deer are developing and utilizing a property. Glass and observe from afar then again you want to be close enough for your kids to get a view. Work on sitting quietly and staying still as practice for hunting season.

Organize and Inventory Hunting Gear

Fall hunting season always sneaks up on us. It is a good summer chore to get your hunting gear organized and inventoried now. Starting now gives you plenty of time to replace any items you have used over the past season and also purchase any new hunting gear you may need. Don’t forget to check your youth hunting gear also. More than likely youth hunting clothing from last year isn’t going to fit this year as fast as they grow so you will have to prepare for that. If you’re thinking about how to get kids into hunting this season, what gear might you need to have in addition to your own? All things to consider when organizing and inventorying your hunting gear over summer.

Impacts of Getting Kids Involved in Hunting Chores During Summer

Kids are a sponge for learning. That is why the impact of getting them involved in hunting chores over summer is so important. Cultivating the outdoors from a young age instills that passion for it for a lifetime. Some of the best and most remembered memories as kids are the ones where you are checking mineral stations or sitting on the tractor tending a food plot. Youth hunters are born and future hunters are educated through these undertakings.

Youth hunting opportunities start with getting kids involved early and often with all aspects of hunting. These six summer hunting chores are some of many ways for getting kids involved in hunting. Include your kids in all aspects of hunting, including the many chores needed each year for making a successful hunting season.

oppurtunities challenges with youth hunting | Raised Hunting

Opportunities and Challenges with Youth Hunting

Ways of Getting Kids Involved and Mistakes to Avoid with Youth Hunting

Each and every time you go hunting it is special. Whether you have been hunting for 30 years or have just started with the sport, you have or will accumulate a lot of special outdoor memories from each day in the field. For those that have been sportsmen and women since early youth hunting days, we remember our first positive hunting experience and nothing is more special than being there for that first successful youth hunting experience by our own children.

Like many who love to be outdoors and hunt, our hope has always been to share our passion for the outdoors with our children. Hunting is more than a sport, it is a lifestyle that passes along values like tradition, respect and a desire to better ourselves. As parents, we want our children to grow up with an interest in the outdoors, and hunting particularly so that they can enjoy and understand how the family hunting tradition enriches our lives. There are, however, times when youth hunting may not develop as we would like. Kids will move to their own passions early on and as parents, we respect that. While there is no guarantee that each one of our kids will take part in our outdoor passion, there are certain things we can do as a parent or youth hunting mentor to help in developing that lifelong passion for hunting.

3 Tips for Getting Kids Involved in Hunting

Generally, kids take an interest in just about anything their parents are doing. At a young age, children are fascinated by what you do and curious about being like you. It is a good thing and one characteristic that helps in getting kids involved in hunting. If your kids seem to take an interest in hunting, here are three youth hunting tips to help foster that interest.

Start Youth Hunting Early?

Curiosity alone will have your kids asking questions about where you are going or what type of animal that is if you should be so lucky to harvest one. Eventually, that curiosity will lead to the time when they ask if they can go with you hunting.

Getting asked this question as a parent is both amazingly satisfying and also challenging. It can be tough because many of us take hunting seriously, and rightfully so. But getting kids involved in hunting at a young age requires you to adapt and change the way you hunt. Having your kids along means making shorter trips, hunting different and often unproductive areas and lowers your expectations about the chances of harvesting an animal. These are the sacrifices you need to make to get your kids hunting early on in life.

Starting them early is different than pushing them into the sport. Children can quickly lose interest in the outdoors simply from being pushed too hard because a parent or youth hunting mentor wants so badly for them to take part in the outdoor experience. We, as hunters, all want our kids hunting with us. However, forcing them into hunting either too soon or because they have yet to build an interest will be the quickest way to lose a future hunter. If they do not show as much interest as you would like, then give them their space. Often youth hunting takes times. Always keep the invitation open, but never force them to be an unwilling participant.

First Impressions Matter

Regardless of the child’s age, the first few days afield are the most critical in determining whether or not he/she maintains an interest in hunting. These first youth hunting experiences, like any first impression, are where the child is going to form their opinion about hunting. They are either going to decide that hunting is fun and enjoyable or that it may not be something for them. Your job is to not push them and make the first impression a fun youth hunting experience.

The first step to ensuring that a child’s first hunt is not their last is to keep the initial outings brief. Kids have short attention spans, for no fault other than being a kid. That being said, the last thing they want to do is go sit in a blind or a Hawk ladder tree stand for hours on end no matter how into hunting they may already be. As soon as the questions start coming, like “when are we leaving”? or how much longer are we hunting, their attention has veered away from hunting. Take these cues as it is time to make a change or wrap it up completely for the day. Either change spots, take a walk or end the youth hunting day completely.

Secondly, during that time you are focused on hunting you want to help young hunters be successful. All the youth hunting tips and best practices only go so far if eventually a child does not get to experience success. Success can take many forms but for kids, it usually relates to harvesting an animal. Kids find it difficult to comprehend sitting for hours not seeing or shooting any game. Start them off with hunting squirrels, doves or other small game where there are opportunities to see and harvest animals. The other alternative is to find hunting areas that are plentiful with game. Many landowners are willing to open up their farms and forests to youth hunting if you ask. Many times these private oases are loaded with does and absent from other hunters, especially during youth hunting seasons.

Although there is a substantial amount of time and effort leading up to a first successful youth hunt, the first taste of success almost always instantly hooks a kid to hunting for life. Excitement and a sense of accomplishment flow from a kid’s eyes when they harvest their first game animal. The excitement and sense of pride are not only within the child but also with you, knowing you played a big part in their success, which is rewarding no matter what activity it is your kids are doing.

Equipping Youth Hunters Properly

Along with making a good first impression to young hunters, your kids should be as comfortable as possible while outdoors. Equip your kids with the right youth hunting clothing and gear. If you are fully invested in hunting with kids, then invest in them with the proper equipment. Youth hunting clothing today has many of the same qualities adult clothing has to ensure your kids stay warm and dry. This is sometimes an expensive proposition as kids grow out of clothes just about each year, but the downside to not having good hunting clothing and proper boots could be a lost future hunter.

oppurtunities challenges with youth hunting | Raised Hunting

Aside from clothing and gear, you also want to make sure the weapon they are using is fitted correctly for them. The most important reason is for safety. An oversized firearm can lead to not being able to shoulder the gun correctly and recoil that is unmanageable. You want to find youth versions of a firearm and introduce youth hunters early to shooting to make sure the weapon is safe to use and they know how to be safe shooting it. For a bow, it means finding one with the proper draw length and weight so it is comfortable to pull back and shoot. Bear Archery has several youth bow packages that are specifically designed with kids in mind. Without considering the right equipment, including a firearm or bow, your kids may become frustrated and disappointed. Equip them properly, no different than you would yourself, for successful youth hunting.

6 Youth Hunting Mistakes to Avoid?

Hunting with kids is both rewarding and challenging. It is much different than hunting with a buddy or by yourself. Once you have peaked an interest in hunting, avoid these six mistakes when taking your kids hunting.

Unrealistic Expectations

Expectations for youth hunting are and should be, much different than those you have heading to the woods by yourself. Kids will be restless and inquisitive, both of which should be expected while hunting. Encourage questions about the outdoors and hunting. Hunting with younger kids is more about the experience and teaching them the sport than harvesting an animal. Avoid getting frustrated when game animals get spooked away or if you are bombarded with questions during a youth hunting outing.

Not Focusing on Fun

If something is not fun, a child will be reluctant to do the activity again. The same holds true with hunting. Instead of trying to sit motionless for hours on end, identify birds and trees or start a mini scavenger hunt to keep it fun. Let them use your Nikon binoculars to spot game or blow a few grunts from your Primos grunt tube. In addition, talk up hunting every chance you get. Half of the adventure is the anticipation and the planning before the hunt.

Missing Youth Hunting Opportunities

Many states have started youth hunting seasons as a way to give youngsters an opportunity outside of the normal adult hunting seasons. These few days a year can be some of the best for youth hunting as hunting pressure is limited and some even provide an early chance at deer or turkeys before the main season opens.

There are also many mentored youth hunting programs available in different states to provide opportunities for kids to learn from a licensed adult hunter. License fees are reduced and special privileges are granted to youth hunters as a way to expand their opportunities. Take advantage of all you can.

Forgetting Safety First

Safety should always be priority one while hunting, especially when hunting with kids. Avoid even the chance of a safety mistake by thinking ahead on what may be encountered during the hunt. For instance, focus on firearm safety if going out for deer or discuss how to walk safely through the woods if you plan on traversing rough terrain. Accidents do and will happen, but preparing beforehand as much as possible from a safety standpoint lessens the chances they will.

Hunting in Extreme Weather

Days in the woods are limited by work and other daily life responsibilities. Avoid pushing to hunt on a day when the weather is bad. Nothing can ruin a youth hunting experience more than being uncomfortable while in the field. If bad weather cannot be avoided, then make sure you have the proper youth hunting clothing and gear needed to make the experience as comfortable and safe as possible.

Overly Controlling the Hunt

Part of hunting is being outdoors. That means enjoying and exploring the natural environment. A common mistake, particularly with younger hunters, is to overly control every action of the hunt. Relinquishing control on things like letting your kids prepare their own youth hunting gear or having them use the Garmin to find the hunting spot are all ways to get them more involved in the hunt. It is part of the learning process, and by doing everything for them they will never be able to learn from their mistakes.

To conclude, there are many opportunities and challenges when it comes to youth hunting. Getting kids involved in hunting is a rewarding experience for a parent or hunting mentor. Your focus should be to get kids involved early without pushing them, make a good first impression when hunting and to give them the proper tools, clothing and gear they need to be successful.

In order to continue the enthusiasm for hunting beyond those first few hunts, avoid certain mistakes like having unrealistic expectations, not having fun, missing youth hunting opportunities, forgetting about safety, hunting in extreme weather and controlling every aspect of the hunt. Finally, hunting with kids comes down to the experience and instilling in them the values the sport provides with the hope they will continue the tradition on into their adult lives. Reflect on each youth hunting outing not only from your perspective but from your child’s viewpoint. Let them shape the experience and tell the tale from their eyes. Getting kids involved and trying to avoid youth hunting mistakes along the way go far in growing the next generation of outdoorsmen and women.

Youth Hunting | Introducing Young Hunters to the Outdoors

Opportunities in Spring Turkey Season to Get Youth Hunting in the Outdoors

Connecting kids to the outdoors and passing along the traditions you grew up with are some of the most important reasons to get into the woods this spring with a child. Hunting, and particularly youth hunting, instills values, encourages healthy living and develops life skills such as discipline, respect and good sportsmanship. Spring turkey hunting is an opportunity for outdoor youth adventures to start a child’s lifelong desire for hunting by cultivating them into outdoor enthusiasts.

Think about the real reason most of us hunt. Part of hunting is certainly about being successful. Successful hunts, however, are not only defined by harvesting an animal. Most of us hunt because we love seeing game from one season to another. Hunters are outdoors people. We enjoy sitting in a stand during a silent evening sunset or listening for the sound of a turkey gobbling as the sun begins to rise on a spring morning. It is for these moments and the countless others that keep us preserving the sport. We get to see things in the wild that most have never seen and that brings with it a sense of triumph whether or not we bag an animal.

Youth hunting is about getting kids excited to be outdoors. Again, we all enjoy harvesting an animal but most of us are in the woods as much as possible because we are outdoor enthusiasts. Young children are geared for exploration. Make each hunting experience, from the very first hunt to when they start mastering the craft, an outdoor youth adventure. Allow them to explore the woods. Encourage kids to observe the natural environment around them by gathering insects or looking for birds. Teach them about the wilderness which surrounds them, such as names of trees or why a plant is growing in a particular area, all while making the connection between animals and their habitat.

Introducing young hunters to the outdoors youth hunting | Raised Hunting

Spring turkey season, especially later in the year, is perfect for introducing kids to hunting. The weather cooperates more than deer season making it easier to get youth outdoors. Warmer spring weather also means activity in the woods. Animals are active as flora and fauna begin to awaken from winter. Youth turkey hunting is much less about landing a gobbler but more so about introducing your child to the outdoors. Get youngsters geared up with a youth turkey hunting vest and other youth hunting gear so they feel like part of the hunt. If you have the opportunity, hunting out of a blind is the best way to go after turkeys with a kid. Blinds, combined with the right gear, provide more comfort for kids than setting up next to a tree on the ground. Kids can move around and softly talk in a blind while maintaining concealment waiting for an approaching turkey. A simple box call like the Primos Matchbox is a great addition to their youth turkey hunting vest. Show them the art of calling and let them practice even though it may be a bit scratchy and inconsistence, it gives them a sense of accomplishment in the field. End the hunt when they are ready. Do not push young hunters to sit for long periods of time or be uncomfortable from weather. Have fun and keep them engaged for the purpose of the hunt without the rigidity of your normal turkey setup, and the more successful your youth hunting experience will be.

Youth Hunting in Blinds – What goes in your hunting blind with you
(Video) – One of the most important parts of using a hunting blind is what goes in with you. You can move less and be comfortable than you will be more successful.

3 Keys to Successful Youth Turkey Hunting

  1. Safety – Hunting safely should be at the forefront of every hunter’s mind and even more so when afield with a child. Teach your children to respect and be aware of other hunters while in the woods. If that means wearing a youth orange vest for safety walking to and from your hunting spot, then do it. As they mature, get your kids involved in hunter education programs such as hunter safety courses, local sportsmen clubs and outdoor youth programs like the Raised at Full Draw Bowhunting camps. Safety is not always related to hunting. Kids are curious so be mindful of the potential for snakes and biting insects. Remember that accidents can happen to anyone, and hunting with someone who is inexperienced increases the likelihood. Don’t assume your child knows the ins and outs of hunting safety, but rather teach him or her through your own safe habits and behaviors in the woods.
  1. Correct Expectations – Setting unrealistic expectations can ruin not only your hunt but can be disastrous to your overall outdoor youth adventure. Young hunters are going to be restless. Keep in mind the hunt is more about exposing your child to the hunting experience than harvesting an animal. Encourage them to ask questions. Keep youth hunting trips short and active. Sit for a little and call them move on to another spot, only if it is just a 100 yards away, it will keep kids interested in the thrill of the hunt.
  1. Preparation – Preparing for a hunt is one of the most important phases. Be prepared with everything your child may need in the woods. Throw some snacks and drinks into your pack to refuel along the trail. Bring extra youth hunting clothes or rain gear in case it gets unexpectedly cold or rainy. Add a first aid kit to your youth hunting stuff to be ready for any minor injuries like cuts, scratches or bug bites. Also, have your child take part in hunting preparation. Let them pack their youth turkey hunting vest with the items they feel they need, which gives them an opportunity to contribute and gives you the chance to show them how to successfully prepare for a hunt.

Youth hunting is not for every child, and that’s OK. Don’t force it. The more a child feels pushed into outdoor youth adventures, the less he or she will want to do it. Back off and eventually your child may ask to go hunting with you. The earlier you introduce hunting to kids, the more likely they will continue hunting into adulthood. Use these early years to educate with the knowledge you have gained from your years of hunting to show them the wonderful outdoor world. Creating these outdoor youth adventures will produce a sense of purpose in the woods and continue the family hunting tradition. The time you spend outdoors with your children provides lifelong memories, ones that will instill within them the passion to pass along hunting experiences to future generations.

Why Youth Hunting is so Critical Today

Why Youth Hunting is So Critical Today

Bowhunting Education | How Youth Bow Hunting Can Make Lifelong Hunters

Surely you’re familiar with the popular idiom, “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” Here’s a surprising fact for some: this isnt just about crappie tactics. It’s really about the value of teaching over just doing for someone else, which is especially true for youth hunting. Most of the time with children, it’s just easier to do something for them (e.g., tie their shoes, answer their math question, etc.) instead of teaching them how to do it themselves. But they’ll never learn and will always depend on you for that task. As parents, it’s critical that we equip our kids with the knowledge and skills to grow up and do things on their own.

This is an extremely important lesson for youth hunting. Sure, we could always feed our kids venison. But that’s cheating them of the amazing experiences that the autumn woods hold for archery fanatics. Bow hunting doesn’t just teach us about the natural world, the resilient wildlife species that inhabit it, and food awareness. It also teaches us virtues like patience, respect, ethics, confidence, responsibility, and emotional control. It doesn’t take much imagination to agree that more children would be better off as adults with these traits.

But on a larger scale, hunter recruitment and retention is extremely important for anyone who enjoys the great outdoors. Hunters are consistently at the forefront of wildlife conservation and habitat restoration efforts. As hunter numbers decline, so too does the funding and interest in these causes. Introducing children to the sport is the cure-all solution. Here are some tips and techniques to help introduce your child, relative, or family friend to youth hunting.

Awareness in the Early Stages

One of the first and most necessary things you should do is to get your youth interested and excited about hunting. This is fairly easy to do as most young kids are fairly interested in wildlife and nature already, but some will take to it slower than others. Have them watch your favorite bow hunting programs, such as Raised Hunting. Take them on walks in the woods or farm to explore new things. In the late winter and spring, take them with to go scouting and shed hunting. Teach them why deer rub trees and shed their antlers, and make it feel like a scavenger hunt. If they get tired or bored, accept that their attention spans will be shorter and be willing to leave early.

Try sitting in a blind with them where they can get away with some fidgeting and movement without spooking wildlife. Hopefully they can watch turkeys and deer at close range and feel the excitement that goes with it. Also show them the animals you harvest with your bow, so they can get an up-close view of the animal they are chasing. Make your excitement contagious when you’re showing them so that they can feel the same way.

This stage needs to focus on keeping things fun for them. You don’t want it to become a forced march for them against their will. If they have to hike long distances and get yelled at for goofing off, they may not be so inclined to go out again. The biggest thing you can do to help is just trying to have fun while you’re outdoors with them. Try not to be as rigid as you usually are while archery hunting on your own, be willing to laugh and joke with them, and don’t scold them unless it’s a dangerous behavior. The fun memories are ultimately what will get them to come back to try it again.

Time to Pick Up the Bow

If they seem interested in being outdoors and hunting in general, the next step is to get them their own youth hunting gear and a bow to practice with. Start young kids (i.e., 5 to 10 years old) off with a small compound bow that’s easy to pull back, such as the Bear Archery Scout compound bow for kids. Also be sure to grab some Gold Tip Falcon 35 Arrows, and a Tru-Fire Junior Release. You can even use round-tipped play arrows for a while. They can practice with these to grasp the basic concepts and safety considerations until they are able to use a youth compound bow. Most states allow youth hunting with a bow at ages 10 to 12, provided a licensed hunter accompanies them.

You can find youth compound bows for sale at almost any sporting goods store, like SCHEELS, near you or bear compound bows for kids through Bear Archery. Either way, they can help you find one that fits your child well. Like any hunting gear for kids, it’s tricky business because you don’t want to get one that’s too large for them, but don’t want to buy a new bow every couple years as they grow. Try to find a happy middle ground between these two approaches. Regarding the size, a proper bow shop can match a bow to your child’s frame, and determine the best draw weight. Start small at first (i.e. generally around 15-20 pounds), but allow them to work up the strength as their form improves. If you start too heavy, your youth may pick up some bad habits that will need correcting down the road. They won’t enjoy practicing and it could even discourage them from continuing to hunt.

Practice Makes Perfect

Once they’ve got good youth bows to fit them, you need to make sure they practice. As with any skill, the more they practice, the better they’ll get. The same is true for youth hunting. But as in the first step above, you need to keep it fun for them. In other words, don’t tell them they need to practice 20 arrows a day or you’ll never be good enough to shoot a whitetail. Hopefully that’s common sense, but it needs to be stated. Instead of that approach, get them interested in practicing on their own by setting up a small 3D target range in your back yard or taking them with to an archery range. When they get to shoot at anything from whitetails to dinosaurs to aliens, you can bet they’ll stay interested. Even for adult bow hunters, it’s nice to have some variety! Get them comfortable shooting from ground level before moving to an elevated position.

Raised At Full Draw Camps
(video)- Raised At Full Draw Camps, educates and involves the youth in the outdoors. These camps are to save the heritage of hunting and to pass it on to the next generation

If they seem really interested, you may want to send them to youth summer camps to learn some more archery skills, practice with peers, and just generally have a fun time. The Raised at Full Draw (RAFD) bow hunting camp exists to help youth learn archery and hunting techniques through hands-on outdoor education activities in a fun camp style of learning. It follows the curriculum of the National Bowhunter Education Foundation (NBEF) book, and ultimately does lead to bowhunting education certification.

Another nice way to keep them practicing is to start a weekly family bow hunting practice session, where the whole family gets to work on their shooting skills. A family that bow hunts together stays together. Or at least that’s what they say, right? Keep it interesting by playing different archery games and challenging each other in friendly competitions. For example, the best shot of the week gets to choose a fun meal for the family. Or perhaps they get out of doing dishes or mowing the lawn that week.

Why Youth Hunting is so Critical Today

Take Your Youth Hunting

If they’ve practiced like we discuss above, they should be ready for youth bow hunting in a real situation soon. You’ll have to make that call based on the accuracy, consistency, and dedication of your youth. It’s usually required to sit with them during the youth hunting season the first couple times in a blind or tree stand, so you can advise them in a pinch and observe how safe they act in the tree stand. Set them up with a Rage broadhead to ensure their quarry won’t go far.

If you feel like they are acting safely and responsibly, and could ethically make a good shot, you may decide to let them hunt on their own the next year. This can be a nerve-racking decision, but you have to let them “fish” on their own at some point.

Congratulations! You helped create a potentially lifelong bow hunter, who will likely teach their kids and others someday, thus ensuring the future of our cherished sport. And if we all introduce at least one child to the tradition of hunting, our future looks brighter than ever.